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Surviving as a Flash Platform Component Maker

Posted in Business, Flex, Community MX, Adobe, Best Practices, Components, Flash Platform Community by Joeflash on the October 17th, 2009

There is no doubt: making it as a commercial component maker is a tricky business, what with open source competition on the one hand, and Adobe being possible competition on the other. Now that we’ve defined the kinds of commercial components in the previous post, with these roadblocks, how do you make it in the current commercial ecosystem?

While reviewing recent discussions over at Grant’s blog while writing my previous post, I was reminded of a few things about successful component companies, which I recently discussed in an email conversation with Jeffry Houser over at Flextras about the matter, who encouraged me to blog about some of the points I brought up.

Now keep in mind I’ve never built a business model around making money developing Flash components, so take this part for what it’s worth; however there are a few things I’ve observed over the last decade in the Macromedia/Adobe/Flash industry about successes and failures in this area.

Most commercial Flash component makers start in one of two places:
a) they begin offering mid-level components
b) they have a successful but related business, and offer commercial components to go with their existing proprietary SAAS or server technology.

We won’t even talk about throwaway commercial components, because as I mentioned in the previous post, they should be open sourced anyways.

Starting a commercial component business based solely on mid-level components, as some have done, offers the benefit of relatively little startup capital (basically sweat equity), which gets you up and running very quickly. However, mid-level components can be challenging to hang a business model on, for a few reasons:

a) If they are “extensions,” (i.e. AcmeEnhancedDataGrid) Adobe could, tomorrow if they feel like it, come along and incorporate those ideas into the next version of the framework. In other words, your components may at some point come into conflict with FOSS components of similar functionality.

b) Which means that someone else could also, if they put in the effort, rip off your ideas, at least functionally, and present unwanted, even “illicit” competition, depending on how much they copied you.

c) The lack of phone support and strict licensing means that IT departments, used to spending big bucks to have added functionality at a minimum of fuss, might not regard it/them as serious candidates for an enterprise app, and may not even bother to dig into the API to find out if it has green threading or loose binding functionality.
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